OBP News

Attention to all who work in the legal community! The Weld County Bar Association is proud to host its Eighth Annual Law Day honoring those who work in the legal field. The event will be held on May 5th from 7:30 -8:30 am., at the Plaza West, Jury Assembly Room. RSVP information is included on the flyer. There is no cost to attend!

Congratulations to Fred Otis for being honored as a Volunteer of the Year! Fred not only serves on the United Way Board of Directors, but he has also given extensive time in helping the homeless in Weld County.

Why Is My Contract So Long?


“The time to repair the roof
is when the sun is shining.”
-John F. Kennedy

 

You entered into a pretty basic commercial deal, and decided to do things properly and get it drawn up by an attorney. You’ve now received a ‘draft’ from the attorney and it’s long. It was a simple deal. Why are there so many terms? Why is it several pages in length? The answer lies in risk-shifting, or preparing for the rain.

Contracts are generally signed in good times, when the sun is shining. The parties typically have high expectations of the success of the agreement and may not consider what happens if and when things don’t go as planned. However, it is important to prepare for the bad times, to formulate terms that consider risks that may arise after the contract is signed. There are many ways a contract can be drafted to guard against the rain – two of the more common ones are representations and warranties and indemnity provisions.

Representations and Warranties

A representation is simply a statement of fact upon which another party is expected to rely, while a warranty is a party’s assurance as to a particular fact coupled with an implied indemnification obligation if that fact is false. Representations and warranties are generally used to allocate risk by (1) apportioning exposure to potential losses and shifting risk from the recipient to the maker; (2) creating a direct claim against the maker if representations and warranties are inaccurate; and (3) serving as a basis for the parties’ indemnification rights.

Indemnification

An indemnification clause is a promise to protect and defend another in the event a particular set of circumstances leads to a loss suffered by another party. Indemnity provisions are the primary vehicle by which parties typically shift or apportion risk in a contract.  Indemnity provisions may include any, or all, of three obligations to (1) indemnify, (2) defend, and (3) hold harmless the other party. A well-drafted indemnification provision allows parties to customize their risk allocation by shifting the burden of loss and compensating an indemnified party for risks it did not assume and expenses that may not be recoverable under common law, like attorneys’ fees.

Having an attorney draft or review your contract before signing is recommended. It is imperative that you understand the potential consequences of the risk-shifting provisions in any contract. By carefully drafting and negotiating a contract before execution, during the good times, you can best protect yourself or your company from the inevitable rain.

Otis, Bedingfield & Peters, LLC attorney Nate Wallshein appointed to the board of The Matthews House

Otis, Bedingfield & Peters, LLC is proud to announce that attorney Nate Wallshein was appointed to the board of the Matthews House.

The Matthews House is an organization that empowers young adults and families in transition to navigate difficulties on the road to self-sufficiency. Many individuals in the program do not have a significant support system nor the skills necessary for living independently. The Matthews House provides resources and relationships necessary for those to take control of their lives and shape positive futures for themselves.

“I am humbled and thrilled to serve on the Board at The Matthews House. The staff and volunteers provide much needed services in our community by empowering youth and families in times of transition, and by providing preventive, educational, and vocational training. The incredible support from northern Colorado residents drives our success and continues to strengthen our community,” said Nate Wallshein.

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Otis, Bedingfield & Peters, LLC provides real estate law and business law services throughout Northern Colorado. OBP has 15 attorneys spread across its two offices in Greeley and Loveland. For more information, contact Nate Wallshein at nwallshein@nocoattorneys.com or Jennifer Lynn Peters at jpeters@nocoattorneys.com or 970-330-6700 or visit www.nocoattorneys.com.

John Kolanz is a partner with Otis, Bedingfield and Peters, LLC in Loveland. He focuses on environmental matters and can be reached at 970-663-7300 or JKolanz@nocoattorneys.com.

jak

 

The entire staff agrees, we work for the finest attorneys around and we wished them a very Happy Boss’s Day yesterday!

We are privileged and proud to say we work for the awesome attorneys at OBP!bosss-day

We extend congratulations to Diane Goddard on her 20th work anniversary! She’s still smiling after 20 years!

diane-20th-anniversary

 

 

Considering options for your home if you are worried about long-term care – By: Timothy P. Brynteson

Tim BMany of our older clients are worried about two things – 1. Having the resources to afford long-term care, or qualifying for government assistance if they don’t, typically Medicaid; and 2.  They want to leave their house to their heirs if it is one of their primary assets. These concerns are true even for reasonably healthy individuals.

These concerns lead to questions of strategies for those who own their homes and wish to live there as long as possible, but are concerned that one, or both (if they are a couple) will need expensive, long-term care in either an assisted living facility or a nursing home.  Is there a way to continue to own your home as long as possible, qualify for Medicaid AND make sure the family home is passed on to the children?  The short answer is that it is difficult to accomplish this goal without giving up ownership and taking actions which require long-term planning.   This brief article will not explore all the avenues to both preserve assets to pass on to heirs and minimize your “countable” assets in qualifying to Medicaid assistance, but will provide a brief discussion regarding the family home.

The most common strategy many people will employ is to transfer ownership of the home to a child, but continue to live in the home.   While this strategy can sometimes “work” – there are several potential problems with this course of action.  First, Medicaid utilizes a look-back period for assets that were transferred within 5 years of a person applying for Medicaid.  This means that if you transfer ownership of your home to a child (or children) and need to apply for Medicaid within 5 years of the transfer, Medicaid will impose a penalty period during which you will not be eligible to receive benefits.  The period is calculated by dividing the value of the assets transferred by the average monthly cost of long term care in the state to arrive at the number of months you will be ineligible.  Worse, the penalty period will begin running on the first day you start receiving services and would be eligible for Medicaid, but for the transfer.

The second potential problem, even if the 5 year look-back period isn’t an issue, is that you give up ownership of your home and it is now owned by someone else.  While this can often work out just fine, sometimes we can’t always control events in our children’s lives.  Events such as lawsuits, accidents, divorce and the loss of a job may put their ownership of “your” house in jeopardy.

You should be very careful in considering options for your home if you are worried about needing long-term care and talk with an attorney specializing in such matters before taking steps on your own.

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Tim Brynteson is a partner with Otis, Bedingfield and Peters LLC in Loveland. Tim’s practice emphasizes on business transactions, real estate, business succession planning, estate planning, probate administration, and tax controversies and can be reached at 970-663-7300 or tbrynteson@nocoattorneys.com.