Why Is My Contract So Long?


“The time to repair the roof
is when the sun is shining.”
-John F. Kennedy

 

You entered into a pretty basic commercial deal, and decided to do things properly and get it drawn up by an attorney. You’ve now received a ‘draft’ from the attorney and it’s long. It was a simple deal. Why are there so many terms? Why is it several pages in length? The answer lies in risk-shifting, or preparing for the rain.

Contracts are generally signed in good times, when the sun is shining. The parties typically have high expectations of the success of the agreement and may not consider what happens if and when things don’t go as planned. However, it is important to prepare for the bad times, to formulate terms that consider risks that may arise after the contract is signed. There are many ways a contract can be drafted to guard against the rain – two of the more common ones are representations and warranties and indemnity provisions.

Representations and Warranties

A representation is simply a statement of fact upon which another party is expected to rely, while a warranty is a party’s assurance as to a particular fact coupled with an implied indemnification obligation if that fact is false. Representations and warranties are generally used to allocate risk by (1) apportioning exposure to potential losses and shifting risk from the recipient to the maker; (2) creating a direct claim against the maker if representations and warranties are inaccurate; and (3) serving as a basis for the parties’ indemnification rights.

Indemnification

An indemnification clause is a promise to protect and defend another in the event a particular set of circumstances leads to a loss suffered by another party. Indemnity provisions are the primary vehicle by which parties typically shift or apportion risk in a contract.  Indemnity provisions may include any, or all, of three obligations to (1) indemnify, (2) defend, and (3) hold harmless the other party. A well-drafted indemnification provision allows parties to customize their risk allocation by shifting the burden of loss and compensating an indemnified party for risks it did not assume and expenses that may not be recoverable under common law, like attorneys’ fees.

Having an attorney draft or review your contract before signing is recommended. It is imperative that you understand the potential consequences of the risk-shifting provisions in any contract. By carefully drafting and negotiating a contract before execution, during the good times, you can best protect yourself or your company from the inevitable rain.

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